6 Early Signs of Adderall Addiction

6 Early Signs of Adderall Addiction cover

‍Adderall is a popular drug used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the effects of daytime fatigue. The drug is notorious for being one of the most addictive prescription amphetamines. Approximately 20% of all college students abuse stimulants such as Adderall. Adderall also has a high potential for abuse and addiction. This stems from its ability to increase focus and concentration while reducing appetite. Those with ADHD already know these benefits of Adderall, but unfortunately, those same properties can lead to Adderall addiction. If you or someone you love is considering taking Adderall, there are red flags you should look out for before taking it. Here are 6 early signs that indicate an Adderall addiction may be forming:

You take more Adderall than prescribed

The first sign of an Adderall addiction is taking more of the drug than prescribed. If you've been prescribed a 10mg dosage and you take 20mg or more, you'll likely see the benefits of the Adderall increase when it comes to your focus and attention. However, you may also see an increase in side effects, such as digestive discomfort, insomnia, and anxiety. You may also notice taking more than prescribed can quickly become a habit. This can make it difficult to wean off the drug once it has been prescribed. At that point, you're already on a slippery slope towards Adderall addiction.

You feel the need to use Adderall constantly

If you take Adderall on a regular basis, you may feel like you need to use it to function at all. This can be a sign of an Adderall addiction. If you find yourself needing Adderall more often than prescribed, it's possible you have become addicted to the drug. Increasing the dosage of Adderall can lead to a buildup of toxins in your body. This buildup of toxins can cause you to feel unwell, leading to a feeling of needing Adderall in order to function. It's important to keep in mind that you don't need Adderall to function properly. Trying to wean yourself off the drug or taking a lower dosage may help you reduce your need for Adderall. In some cases, it may be best to seek out help for an Adderall addiction.

You've stopped participating in activities you enjoy

Another warning sign of an Adderall addiction is stopping all activities you used to enjoy. If you've taken Adderall for a long period of time, you may find that you've stopped enjoying activities you once loved. If you've been using Adderall to treat ADHD symptoms, this change in lifestyle could be caused by your disorder. However, if you've been using Adderall in non-prescribed ways, you may have stopped enjoying activities as a way to reduce the cravings. This may be because you feel you need Adderall in order to enjoy yourself. It may also be a result of the way Adderall affects your brain. This drug can alter your brain chemistry, making you feel more extroverted and confident. This can lead you to believe that you need Adderall in order to enjoy yourself. If you find yourself needing Adderall in order to enjoy yourself, you may have an addiction.

You have frequent mood swings from depression to euphoria

Another side effect of abusing Adderall is experiencing emotional mood swings from depression to euphoria. This may occur if you take larger quantities of Adderall than prescribed. If you are taking Adderall for a legitimate medical reason, this change in mood should be reported to your doctor. It can be caused by changing levels of serotonin in your brain. However, it can also indicate an Adderall addiction. If you take Adderall and notice frequent mood swings, you may have an addiction.

You could also have a co-occurring disorder, like bipolar disorder, which means you need to be monitored more closely. It should also be noted that people who are getting treatment for depression with SSRIs face additional risks, as the combination of SSRIs and Adderall can interfere with the way the brain processes serotonin. Mood swings that last for more than a few days may be a sign of a larger issue. If your mood swings are caused by an Adderall addiction, you likely need to get help as soon as possible.

You have trouble sleeping without Adderall

If you have trouble sleeping without Adderall, you may have an addiction. Typically, those without an addiction are able to sleep well without Adderall. Those with an addiction, however, may find themselves tossing and turning for hours each night. If you take Adderall, your body may build up a tolerance to the drug. This can lead to insomnia because your body becomes used to the high blood levels of Adderall. To combat this, you may need to take higher doses of Adderall. This can quickly turn into a vicious cycle of needing more Adderall to sleep. It can also lead to an Adderall addiction. If you find yourself needing Adderall in order to sleep, you may have an addiction. Getting help for an Adderall addiction may help you sleep better without the drug.

You have negative consequences at school or work

Taking Adderall for a legitimate medical reason can be safe. However, abusing Adderall can lead to negative consequences for your schooling and work life. If you've been abusing Adderall but you've recently stopped, you may find yourself struggling to concentrate at work or school. This can lead to negative consequences for both your work and school life. If you've been abusing Adderall for a long period of time, you may need to take a lower dosage or take time off from school or work. This can be dangerous because you'll be detoxing from Adderall without the help of medical staff.

Getting Help for Adderall Addiction in a Sober Living Home

Adderall is a stimulant drug that is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the effects of daytime fatigue. While it is beneficial for those with ADHD, it has the potential to be highly addictive. If you or someone you love is considering taking Adderall, there are red flags you should look out for. These include taking more Adderall than prescribed, feeling the need to use Adderall constantly, having frequent mood swings from depression to euphoria, having trouble sleeping without Adderall, and having negative consequences at school or work. If you've been abusing Adderall, you should consider getting help at a sober living house.

The best way to overcome an addiction to Adderall is to seek out help. If you feel like you've been abusing Adderall and it's affecting your life, you should consider seeking out a new support system. If you have an addiction to Adderall, you should consider attending a sober living house. These residences can support you as you wean off the drug and deal with any underlying issues you may have. If you feel like you cannot function without Adderall, it's best to seek help before your addiction gets worse. The sooner you get help, the easier it will be to overcome your addiction.

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